Moving to Kirkland

While Kirkland is proud of its extensive and diverse set of waterfront parks, it offers a rich variety of neighborhood playgrounds, ball fields, walking trails, natural and landscaped open spaces and an outdoor public swimming pool.

Kirkland's waterfront location offers unlimited recreational opportunities and spectacular views. Cruise ships depart regularly from downtown to explore Lake Washington's shores. Such offerings make Kirkland a perfect one-day vacation or a place to put down roots.

Natural Kirkland
With its necklace of public parks, Kirkland's amenities are not lost on residents or visitors. Kirkland is regionally known for its outstanding parks system. On sunny summer afternoons, Lake Washington Boulevard is filled with walkers, joggers, bicyclists, roller-bladers, — and a few motorists — traversing the short mile from Marina Park to Carillon Point. Some are out for exercise, others for the lakeside sunsets and others still for kayak and canoe tours or volleyball on the sand courts.

While Kirkland is proud of its extensive and diverse set of waterfront parks, it offers a rich variety of neighborhood playgrounds, ball fields, walking trails, natural and landscaped open spaces and an outdoor public swimming pool.

Bridle Trails State Park is the largest park in Kirkland, with more than 20 miles of scenic equestrian trails winding through a forest. Yarrow Bay Wetlands and Juanita Bay Park are just two examples of the city's successful effort to preserve the delicate balance of nature while allowing residents to enjoy its beauty. In all, Kirkland has preserved more of its waterfront in accessible parkland than any other city in the state.

Kirkland Business
Kirkland's strong local economy is characterized by a healthy mix of small business, corporate headquarters, light industrial and manufacturing, and a growing base of high-tech and home-based businesses. Located in the midst of the booming Eastside economic market, many of Kirkland's businesses indicated expansion plans in the near future. A competitive business climate, with no local Business and Occupation (B&O) tax, and high quality of life make Kirkland a desirable location for both local and world-class enterprises.

Each of Kirkland's economic neighborhoods is distinct. Totem Lake is the drive of Kirkland's economy with a concentration of high-tech, healthcare, manufacturing and distribution industries. It's also home to Totem Lake Mall. Downtown and Carillion Point house an expanding financial and professional services sector attracted to Kirkland's high quality environment and easy access. Neighborhood business districts in Juanita, Houghton and Bridle Trails serve local needs and provide support services to Kirkland regional businesses.

Getting Around Kirkland
Kirkland is located on the eastern shore of Lake Washington, just north of Bellevue and west of Redmond. Access from the north or south is easy on I-405. To reach downtown, take exit 18 and follow the signs to Kirkland. For Totem Lake and north Kirkland neighborhoods, exit 20 is the best option off I-405. Exit 17 leads to both the Bridle Trails and Houghton neighborhoods. SRI 908 connects Kirkland with its bustling neighbor Redmond to the east, and follow SR 520 across Lake Washington to find Seattle to the west. Kirkland is just 10 miles east of downtown Seattle, and 20 minutes northeast of Sea-Tac International Airport.